30581458_158527378176135_8586328421494161408_n

A ball is a magical night when girls and boys dress up in fancy, flowing gowns and well-fitting tuxedos and make memories (usually by means of a front camera) which they will cherish for the rest of their lives.

30713131_158929718135901_2126121361137991680_n

This year, IMU Ball 2018: Le Rêverie was organised by an enthusiastic student committee in hopes that both the students and staff of IMU would seize this opportunity and get a well deserved break from their busy university and working life. The event was held at DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel in Kuala Lumpur on 23rd of March 2018, and themed ‘Alice in Wonderland’. The ballroom was filled with bright flowers and petals, exquisite decorations and other Wonderland-style flourishes that added to the experience of transporting ball-goers to Carroll’s fictional world.

30531308_158527581509448_5664606549645983744_n

30515794_158527001509506_1279507251815514112_n

The evening commenced with the emcees inviting onto the stage Mr. Chan Jie Yong, President of IMU Ball 2018, Mr. Eric Ngu and Ms. Chow Wai Hoong, Vice Presidents of IMU Ball 2018, and Mr James and his colleagues as representatives from AK Group Holdings, the main sponsor of the event, for an opening ceremony. This was then followed by a brief welcoming speech by the president. He stated that the idea of making IMU Ball 2018 a social event for both students and staff, for the first time, allowed them to interact and engage with one another in a more relaxed setting. He also expressed his gratitude to all sponsors, especially AK Group Holdings, and to all members of IMU staff, all the committees, as well as all the students and lecturers for supporting this event and making it a success.

30515813_158535398175333_8567342312403763200_n

The real fun began when Elixir and Singaholics performances, their melodious tune adding to the atmosphere. This was followed by a performance by Jacky, a talented pianist from BM1/16, whose expression captivated  the audiences, after which, a dance team led by IMU students concluded the performances of the evening.

30515669_158536024841937_5793247348511473664_n

To further spice up the night, the nominees for prom king, prom queen, best couple and best dressed, were invited to interact with the attendees. Each of them participated in small games and funny punishments to win over the guests.

The lucky draw was definitely a session no one wanted to miss! Everyone was eager to see who would win the grand prizes: an iPad mini, an ASUS laptop and an HP Inkjet printer. The excitement and anticipation grew in the ballroom as the emcees drew number after number; it was a heart-warming scene to see the students and staff interacting so freely with each other.

The night came to an end as the winners were announced for each category. The hard work that the organizing committee had put in since November of 2017 had finally paid off, in the form of a whimsical evening, which carried everyone to Carroll’s famous Wonderland.

30595273_158942208134652_6964066900963753984_n 30652312_158942364801303_5780931113178365952_n

IMU Ball 2018: Le Rêverie organizing committee is signing off now. Hope to see you all next year.

Congratulations to all the winners:

Prom Queen: Eunice Tang Jia Lin (ME 1/17)

Prom King: Chan Chun Fai (DT 1/16)

Best Couple: Kor Win Sheng (ME 1/16) and How Suet Yuet (ME 1/16)

Best Dressed, Female: Yong Kha Ern (ME 2/16)

Best Dressed, Male: Shamir Das (PS 2/15)

—————————————————————————————————————————–

Written by: Eddy Yii & Yuki Lee

Edited by: Prina Singh & Emlynne

Photo credits: IMU BALL 2018: Le Rêverie Facebook Page

IMU Live is one of the biggest events held in IMU and acts as a platform for students to showcase their talents through different kinds of performances. This competition often encourages students to step out of their comfort zones and display their artistry to a large audience.

29665104_1901369120161188_1086050475930997020_o

On the 16th of March, IMU LIVE! 2018 was held, and it was a smashing success! As the audience members took their seats and the lights became dim, the excitement in the auditorium grew, as did the anticipation of the beginning of the event.

At 7:30, the emcees introduced the event to the audience, explaining that there would be singing and dancing as well as band performances. They also gave acknowledgement to the four clubs that organised the event: the Dance Club, the Music Club, the Choir Club, and the Editorial Board, after which they introduced the judges of the competition, who are immensely talented themselves: Ian, the President of the Music Club and a previous winner of IMU LIVE; Kalok, who has his own YouTube channel and is also the Event Manager of the Music Club; and Akiko, the Vice President of the Dance Club and a member of Infires (the IMU Dance Crew). The emcees then announced the prizes: RM200 for 3rd place, RM300 for 2nd place, and RM500 for 1st place! The emcees then decided to put the hyped-up audience out of their misery and call onto the stage the first performer, thus, starting the competition.

The performances were judged on preparation, delivery or quality, stage presence, creativity and on the performance as a whole. After all the performances, the audience members were asked to vote, and these votes had a 40% weighting factor.

The three winners were: in 3rd place, Stefan New, a mostly self-taught pianist, who beautifully performed Unravel on the piano, which the judges thought was “really, really amazing”; in 2nd place Jackie Thien, also on the piano, made the judges “see their childhood come to life,” with a remarkable Disney-inspired performance; and in 1st place was a rap and beatboxing duo called Pandan Serai, consisting of Alex Yusof and Krish Sajnani, who masterfully dissed our beloved cafeteria (and even our university), an upbeat performance which made the judges want to dance.

28954262_1901348436829923_1233664064567787889_o 28954636_1901348626829904_2835172678736952517_o 29352102_1901347873496646_7458830823125161117_o

The judges and audience members loved each of the three winning performances, however every single person who performed at IMU LIVE was a winner in their own right.

 

Written by: Prina Singh

Photos credits: IMU Live 2018 facebook page

For more photos and videos: IMU Live 2018 facebook page

On the 21st of March 2018, the IMU Pharmacy Students Association (IPSA) was finally brought to life after years of tireless efforts. A launching ceremony initiated by the dean of pharmacy, A/Prof Mohd Zulkefeli, saw approximately 50 pharmacy students in congregation to celebrate this monumental milestone. Vice President of IPSA, Yuki, states that this association had been in the making for the past several years, with students Ooi Zi Qian BP113, Thum Enn Yi BP113, Grace Lee BP114, Emily Chai BP114, Mai Ya Zhe BP114, Brian Tay BP114, Kuan Hui En BP115, Tan Shin Thong BP215 and Lovy Le Er BP116 being the main architects who dedicated their time and energy into making this idea a reality. Ultimately, IPSA aims to unite all pharmacy students within IMU, and aims to give students a platform to foster their teamwork, networking, leadership and professionalism within the field of pharmacy all through this one entity.

29472650_443075036122637_3479615025264459776_o

Members of this association will gain the privilege of exploring career opportunities and will receive the benefit of participating in activities both within and outside of the university. On a larger scale, the unified front of IPSA hopes to fuel confidence in students participating in the annual activities and competitions hosted by the Malaysian Pharmacy Students Association (MYPSA).This will be the first year IMU Pharmacy students will partake in MYPSA as part of an association, and IPSA aims to catapult IMU to higher rankings in these competitions. All in all, IPSA with its myriad of benefits is a great place to lay your foundation as a future pharmacist.

 

Written by,

Emlynne (Head Reporter of IMU Editorial Board)

Photo credit: IPSA Facebook page

Everyone knows that pregnant women aren’t supposed to drink. Some bars won’t even serve a mother-to-be. Such precautions are taken out of respect and responsibility for the unborn child about to enter the world. We see this in the media – a once social drinker politely refusing a drink, smiling and saying “I’m not drinking, I’m pregnant”, receiving a series of “oohs” and “aahs” by an awed audience. Perhaps this predictable scene speaks to the miracle of life which gives cause for celebration. More often than not, the choice to abstain from alcohol is exactly that – a choice. No one is forcing them to trade in that relaxing glass of wine for orange juice – it is a personal, maternal decision, the first true act of selflessness.

When this choice is regarded as a novelty and the mother does not exercise self-restraint, the consequences can be fatal. The transfer of alcohol through the umbilical cord to the developing fetus can result in what are known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, or FASDs whose symptoms range from irreversible physical to mental to behavioural abnormalities (abnormal facial features, learning disabilities, intellectual deficit, hyperactive behaviour etc) or even death (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome). The most common of the fetal alcohol spectrum disorders is known as foetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), a condition in which the child is born with problems with their central nervous system, and have issues in both the academic and social aspects of school. Such aberrations can be prevented with the complete abstinence from alcohol consumption during pregnancy. Simple enough, right?

There are many reasons why a mother-to-be may choose to continue drinking during pregnancy. Considerable duress, addiction or even being unaware of the developing embryo due to an unplanned pregnancy all may factor into such decisions, but the consequences are severe. Then again, is it not the personal choice of the individual whether she can or cannot consume just a glass of wine or pint of beer now and then during the 9 month period? Is it not her body and thus her decision to make?

The severity of the FASDs and the utter unfairness to the newborn child has resulted in propositions that a law should be put in place to criminalize substance abuse by pregnant women. In passing such a bill, the concept of personal autonomy is painstakingly cast aside in an effort to provide the child with the best possible quality of life, free from unnecessary bullying and lifelong frustrations.

This calls into question that extent to which the mother is responsible for the child’s life and the extent to which she is free to make her own decisions. On one hand, the child is a helpless, innocent being, wholly dependent and completely at the mercy of his/her human host and hence the substances being consumed, but on the other hand the mother is an independent individual who has the legal rights to chug some beer or enjoy a cigarette after a stressful day if she so chooses. Unfortunately, the outcome for both of these considerations are mutually exclusive.

Countries which favour the former over the latter will incarcerate or impose punitive legal actions against such women. In the U.S, three states – Alabama, South Carolina and Tennessee have criminalized substance abuse during pregnancy. Others will turn a blind eye and silently pray for the developing fetus. Often there are no specific laws regarding this matter, however many states have been reported to prosecute women for substance abuse.

We now call into question the role of healthcare professionals in all this. They are the ones who will be most likely to detect significant substance abuse, especially addiction, in pregnant women either via trusting patients who confide in them or simple biomedical tests. They should thus be trained in the way to approach such patients regarding their substance abuse and be able to communicate the unique requirements of pregnant women to improve perinatal and neonatal outcomes. Like they say, education is the best way to break the cycle, and information regarding the severe adverse effects of substance abuse during pregnancy will likely appeal to most mothers to be. Ultimately, I believe this training is the most important large scale change that should be made, rather than the focus on legalities.

As much as we like to think that the laws that govern us are steadfast and the people in our community are law-abiding citizens, the contrary may be true. No one can force a person to start or stop doing something, for the long term anyway. In this case, it is in the best interests of both the mother and the unborn child for the mother to receive a basic medical education on substance abuse and its impacts, and simply leave her to make her decision, because in the end, she’s going to be the one that makes it anyway.

-Sabrina Tee

Gratitude and Happiness. As profound as it sounds. What is gratitude and how do you express it? Does having to feel gratitude make you cherish happiness? Ask yourself how many times have you actually cherished the happiness you felt or does it happen in a blink of an eye and you forget about it the very next moment attuning into your frenzied lifestyle. Are gratitude and happiness two different elements or are they interconnected? What are your thoughts?

We live in urban cities, where the whole notion of balance is a challenge. Pollution, traffic, competition, pressure to be successful, shortage of time, and other facets seem to domineer our lives. In all this, how do even find the time for stillness and peace let alone cherishing gratitude and happiness. The time when life was more easy-going and natural in pace sometimes seems like a fairy-tale of the vintage days. It is wishful thinking to imagine going back to that idyllic momentum of life in a modern city, but the good news is we can all develop these fundamental values and qualities in leading a good life.

We are a species which probably has the greatest capacity to reckon the past and also perceive a future, and the very nature of those two qualities battles against our desire to be present in the modern life as we are all preoccupied running primarily for the fulfilment of our material needs. By incorporating elements of gratitude and happiness into our daily routine would make our true nature which is to be present shine allowing us to connect with all making our everyday life more rewarding.

I have the impression that nature opens its doors, inviting us to capture every moment. Where do we find those inspiring moments in life to see the beauty surrounding us, beckoning us to share in the subtle joy? For instance, you go to a party or a wedding and feel so happy meeting your friends and family reuniting with them. You celebrate your surroundings, indulge in small talks, have fun, you live for the moment and when the party ends you bid farewell and then life heads on to the usual loop of busy hours till the next engaging event comes up. Or you go on a vacation with your family spend abundance of time indulging in happiness and fun and then reality hits you and there you are back at work, feeling despondent going through the photos taken during the vacation and scrolling your newsfeed reminiscing the happy moments and feeling the void. You would have spent the best time of your life at an occasion but thereafter you had to move on from it as life comes in forms of shade and shine.

Reminiscing memories absent in the present makes your heart frown. Immediately your attention suffuses to the agony of your present and your mind begins to think that life would be better if you were at the place you wished you could be. What if someone tells you that without a tinge of subdued past thoughts you could feel happy now and here by cherishing your present. Going with the flow of the modern world, given a device which could hoard your joyous moments for eternity and having access to them at your liberty as if u could keep those moments close to you and never let it go. Treasure it. Travel with it. Would you want it? Apparently, this device exists not in the form of a priced gadget but is your very own compassionate heart which has been gifted to you by nature. To be able to recognize and tap the hidden potential of the genuine heart to bring out the happiness in you while being present is the ultimate challenge.

How much time do we take to appreciate the little things in life which is around us is a question every individual should ponder on. Do u remember yourself as a young child leading a carefree and contended life showing receptiveness to the positivity around you? You gave more attention to the things that made you smile and feel happy. A small gesture of your mother birthed a smile on your face. As an adult now, do you even take a moment to look into your parent’s eyes feeling grateful for what they feel for you? As a parent, do you take the time to see your child’s eyes when it yearns for your smile? Why have we surrendered these qualities upon transitioning into adulthood is a question to wonder. Being grateful is a beautiful way to learn to appreciate the wonder of life. It shows in your eyes. Hence, here is something you can do to light the spark in the eyes of those who have grown old at heart: Make a Gratitude Jar. Pick any jar in your home and decorate it to make it special. Let it be your own creation. Start writing gratitude notes on small papers and drop them in the jar.

It is a note on a small piece of paper where you express something for which you are thankful.

It can be a moment in the sun, a good laugh with a buddy, a beautiful flower on the street, the shape of a cloud, your favourite dessert, or a kind gesture to someone. Take the time to appreciate it, to smile and to say, “Thank you”. You can draw, write a poem, or scribble a few words on your paper. With time, your family and the people around you will be curious. Speak to them about gratitude and wonder and tell them that abundance of research has been done to imply that being grateful heightens your well-being and invite them to drop their own gratitude notes in your jar whenever they wish.

Then observe! Look at their eyes when they drop the paper in the jar. Then, choose a special time to open the jar and read the notes. Wonderful memories will come. You can open it when someone is feeling a little low as you invite this person to sit with you to read a few notes. It will bring a smile to their face. Happiness is all around you it is how much effort you take to see it. By connecting your senses to your heart, you shall embrace the happiness around you and feel it within you.

– Amutha Aruvi Kaniamuthan

The Mid-Autumn Festival, also known as the Mooncake festival, falls on 15th day of the 8th month in Chinese lunar calendar with a full moon at night. It is given the name “Mid-Autumn” because it is celebrated in the middle of the autumnal season. During the festive season, Chinese people meet up and have reunion dinners and family gatherings.

Reunion has significant meanings towards the Chinese, as the reunion with friends and family are one of the most blessed moments together, while enjoying delicious mooncakes, tea and wonderful nights lit by the bright moon. But we knew that IMU has a lot of students from other states are unable to have a reunion with their family during this festive season, thus, IMU Huaxia Chinese Cultural Society specially organized an event to allow students to have a reunion with university friends and celebrate the mid-autumn festival together.

First and foremost, event President Ms Chew Teng Teng presented her welcoming speech along with club advisor Dr Lim Chooi Ling.  For this event, IMU Huaxia Chinese Cultural society prepared lots of wonderful and eye-opening performances for all the guests such as 24 festive drums, Chinese orchestra, Chinese yoyo, singing and dancing.

Moreover, the organizing committee had invited 24 festive drums team from University Malaya to celebrate the mid-autumn festival alongside us. 24 festive drums are the combination of 24 festive seasons in Chinese lunar calendar, along with calligraphy and Guang Dong lion dance drums performance. It has become part of Malaysia’s national heritage since the year 2009. 24 festive drums are Chinese traditional basic drum technique with a little twist. Besides being a performance, it is also part of the  cultural identity for the Chinese in South East Asia. Performers use different beats, cheers and body movements to form an amazing performance.

Furthermore, the Chinese orchestra performed using not only er hu, dizi (bamboo flute), lapa (trumpet) and suo na (double-reeded horn) but as part of a breakthrough programme, also with  mixture of western and eastern instruments such as the piano to present a song called – “Liang Liang”. President Ms Chew Teng Teng also performed a song called Sai Ma (Horse Racing).

Chinese yoyo, singing and dancing performances were put on by our skillful and talented students from different courses. Ms Jessica sang two song named “Still the One” and “Hey Soul Sister” while the group Train Wreck performed a song called “Stacy’s Mom”. Last but not least, Surfacten performed a lively Kpop dance.

Besides that, IMU Huaxia Chinese Cultural Society also prepared a thrilling Lantern Riddle competition, mooncake feast and picture taking at the prepared photo booth, located at the IMU driveway. Despite the busy schedules of our students, the organizing committees put in a great deal of effort in making the event a success! Happy Mid-Autumn Festival to IMU Community!

22154371_2063551830546266_9071118748986618470_n

22195637_2063548753879907_9013784069223878201_n 22195993_2063550797213036_5767059064624725075_n 22196145_2063547793880003_6536134523115191295_n 22196186_2063545910546858_3778791884066411458_n 22221614_2063547537213362_4087536088826083606_n 22221747_2063546137213502_1251005806007676910_n 22221764_2063549283879854_462956540232614986_n 22279514_2063563377211778_5090157958653606487_n

written by: Melvin Yong & Eunice

checked by: Anushka

photos by: Eunice

The biggest worriment in this world are we, the human being,

Selfish, all we care about is our wellbeing.

 

We suppress the poor and awe the rich,

Failing to conceive the fault within us, this undesirable glitch.

 

We kill in the name of religion, in the name of God,

That God who advocates neutrality? Alas, our conscious is flawed.

 

We listen to reply, not to understand,

That is why our communication is delicate, just like a rubber band.

 

We talk only to substantiate ourselves right,

No shock for us usually, the truth is far away, out of sight.

 

We judge, we criticize, we distinguish, we discriminate needlessly, isn’t it strange?

For how long will we confide on the future for this attitude to change?

 

Give it time, it heals everything, they said.

But does it have the virtue to bring you back from the dead?

 

MOHAMMAD MANIYAR

ME217 – 00000024791

“Oh God why me?”, you keep whining,

May I ask what makes you so special?

No doubt, every cloud has a silver lining,

But those tough times you face are also essential.

 

“Oh God why me?”, you keep grumbling,

May I ask what makes you so unique?

Your life is naught with no fumbling,

Simply giving way to relentless critique.

 

“Oh God why me?”, you keep complaining,

May I ask what makes you so exclusive?

Apart from frustration, nothing have you been gaining,

And all it has made you is insolent, abusive.

 

I ask, “Oh God why NOT me?”

I am no different than the people around,

Then why should I from my problems flee?

When I fathom HE gives what is best, success bound.

 

MOHAMMAD MANIYAR

ME217 – 00000024791

Sin to have committed,

My love is unforgiving,

Crime to have convicted,

My love is undying.

 

I have failed to provide,

What a mother should have done,

For you my child to complete,

The journey that never begun.

 

I never got to carry,

To cherish; to hold,

The regret I will carry,

For my life as a whole.

 

Forgive this mother,

For i know i have failed,

Never had a choice to be a granter,

For my one and only creation that never availed.

– Jaithra (BP117)

thumbnail_The Coloured Girl
The Coloured Girl

For beauty is colour-blind
Dear albino girl with sapphire eyes
It is just a pigmentation disguise.
You’re that rose in the garden
An amazing pride, not a burden.

– Shameni A/P Vellappan Konasilan (DT116)